Skillern Law Firm, PLLC

Home » Uncategorized (Page 2)

Category Archives: Uncategorized

It’s Important to Update your Estate Planning After A Divorce

Most couples, especially married couples, get their estate planning done together and draft them accordingly. Most of the time, married couples will get a Family Trust, rather than two individual Trusts, and all the beneficiaries/executors/trustees are listed as each other. After the unfortunate event of a divorce, it is extremely important to get your estate planning updated to reflect your life change. Most people’s wishes and ideas about who should receive and manage your property after your death changes after a divorce. The only way to effectively express that intent is to have a new estate plan drafted.

When you get divorced, you absolutely need to update your estate plan. Oklahoma law provides some safeguards for Wills, Trusts, and certain beneficiary designations. Under Oklahoma law, your former spouse does not benefit under your will or Trust, only if your Will or Trust follow the requirements of Oklahoma law. However, these few safeguards are incomplete and will not change your estate plan to exclude your ex-spouse in some situations. The default rule will not revoke any gifts to relatives of your ex-spouse, for example.

It is important to update your Will and/or Trust after a divorce, because the default Oklahoma rules that may or may not apply, and an experienced estate planning attorney will know which ones need updating. One of the best ways to express your new wishes after the divorce is to create or amend your estate plan. This way, you are able to accurately express your new intent with your estate, since divorce usually changes your intent (i.e. leaving the ex-spouse out), and this will ensure that your wishes are clearly communicated.

One important thing to update after a divorce is beneficiary designations on accounts. When you select beneficiaries for life insurance, retirement plans, or bank accounts, you are making a legally significant decision. After you pass away, the institution holding the account will look at your account information, including the death beneficiary, and distribute accordingly. Ex-spouses, if not changed on the account, have a strong chance of benefiting from the account.  Divorce has an very limited effect, if any, on these beneficiary type arrangements.

For example, most people hold a lot of assets in their IRA, 401(k), or other retirement plan. Most people do not realize that these retirement plans are governed by Federal law, and no state (including Oklahoma) can use a divorce decree/order to overcome the beneficiary designation on your retirement plan. This means your ex-spouse will benefit if the beneficiary is not changed. You absolutely have to change the beneficiaries after a divorce decree is final to express your new intent.

Most people have many other things on their minds if they have just gone through a divorce, but it is very important to contact an estate planning attorney, or be active in keeping your estate plan up-to-date. Please contact the Skillern Law Firm, PLLC if you need your estate plan updated or created.

Holiday Open House

Plan on attending the Skillern Law Firm’s Holiday Open House. NO RSVP required. Food and refreshments provided. If you would like to discuss your estate planning needs, or just come for some good conversation, feel free to attend!

 

 

Why Does My Will Need To Be Probated?

A lot of clients seem to be under the misconception that, if your will is valid, self-explanatory, and clear as to your intent, then it does not need to be probated. However, your Last Will and Testament is not effective until it goes through probate. It does not matter if it is clear and unambiguous! The deceased persons’ assets and liabilities cannot legally pass to the beneficiaries named in the will until after the Probate Court enters an Order that shows that the assets pass to the beneficiaries.

For example,many people that own a home in their name and may leave it to their children in a will. During the life of the owner, in order to be able to sell the home, they would need to sign a deed over to the new buyer in the closing process. After they pass away, a buyer will not accept a signed deed from the deceased children since there has been no legal determination or court order granting them the legal right to sign over the deed, since it is still in the deceased person’s name. It will not work to simply provide the buyer  with a copy of the will, since it does not solve ownership problem and they cannot be assured that the will is valid until the probate court has reviewed it. Therefore, only until an Oklahoma Probate Court has reviewed and decreed the will to be a valid Last Will and Testament of the deceased, and that the will legally passes the home onto the children, the children have no legal authority to sign a deed, sell the house, or have any ownership to the house. As a result, there is no will that is effective until it has been probated and through the probate process.

Many people are flustered and upset that their estate has to go through probate when they have a valid will, but they can solve this problem by establishing and funding a Revocable Living Trust. Let Skillern Law Firm help you in this process by calling the law office today.

A Common Error to Avoid Probate

One common scenario that estate planning attorneys encounter is clients who believe that deeding their home to their children solves the problem of avoiding probate. Most retired individual’s main asset is their home, which many have paid their mortgage off.

Such a situation is common for many of our clients, and the attorneys at Skillern Law Firm almost always advise against it. There are several practical and legal reasons to keep your home in your name, some of which are discussed in this article  in the Huffington Post. The two main points that this article relates are property taxes and your child’s liabilities.

There are several more important reasons to avoid transferring your property rights to your child to avoid probate. These include:

  • The relationship with your child could go south, or change once you transfer all your property rights to him/her. It’s amazing how a relationship can change once money or any inheritance is involve. Once the house is in their name, they have all the legal right to the home, and there is no obligation for them to let you live in it or transfer it back to you if you ever change your mind.
  • If you have more than one child, this can put complications on some of your relationships with the other children, and it can create rifts between siblings. Putting your house in the name of one child can create relationship complications, but putting the house into all of your children’s names’ can create paperwork headaches, errors, and inheritance complications.
  • There are other ways to avoid probate. One of the easiest ways to avoid probate is to create a Revocable Living Trust.  You can read more about trusts on a previous post here.  Essentially, a Revocable Living Trust are flexible, customizable depending on your situation, and usually cheaper than what probate will cost your heirs.

Do not make a common estate planning mistake that could possibly cost you to lose your home and cause problems within your family. Contact Skillern Law to discuss how they can assist you to protect your family and heirs, as well as your assets, from probate, liabilities, and common misconceptions about avoiding probate.

From the Wall Street Journal: Give Money Away without Gift-Tax Hit

From the Wall Street Journal: Give Money Away without Gift-Tax Hit

Worried about your Gift-Tax Exclusion?

Simple Ways to Avoid Probate

Most people know that Revocable Living Trusts are a great way to avoid probate. And if you don’t, please read a previous blog about probate and how a trust can help here. On today’s blog post, Skillern Law Firm is going to discuss other ways to avoid probate if you already have a trust, or simple solutions if you have a small estate.

First of all, we’ll say it one more time for emphasis – Get A Revocable Living Trust. I know that you’ve already been told this by our attorneys, and possibly other attorneys, but it is a very simple way to avoid probate (and probate is generally much more expensive than a trust!). If you do not have a trust, and you own anything when you die, your estate will be probated, and your estate will have to hire a probate attorney. This includes if you die with a will or not. A will is a good idea if you absolutely cannot afford a trust, since it helps move the probate process move faster. However, if you want your family to avoid probate altogether, you need to set up a living trust.

After you get a trust, you will need to fund it. The offices of Skillern Law Firm help you fund your trust, so that you are not wasting your money.  A trust is only good if it is funded, otherwise a trust is just a pile of documents without any meaning. However, if you do not follow our instructions, or you get a trust done from an attorney who does not fund his/her client’s trust, then you will need to find your trust. Funding includes transferring all your real and personal property into the trust’s estate, or “corpus.” Essentially, it is making sure your bank accounts, financial accounts, home and land, and any other property is transferred into the trust. You can opt to transfer your property into the trust on your own, but our clients often rely on the services of our attorneys to be confident that all probate-able property is properly titled in the name of your trust.

Next, you will need to make sure that all your retirement accounts, life insurance, annuities, and any other assets have beneficiaries named. This can help you whether you have a trust or not. One thing to make sure, if you do not have a trust, is that you do not have your estate as your beneficiary. If you place your estate as your beneficiary, without a trust, that property will need to be probated, and if you just named  a person, the money would have passed outside of probate. Another thing to make sure that you have multiple contingent beneficiaries in case one of your beneficiaries dies before you do, and you forget to change it or are incapable of changing it. If you have your estate, no beneficiary, or a deceased beneficiary on any of these accounts, then your heirs will have to go through probate court (and all that’s involved with that) to gain access to these assets. One more small note is to make sure none of your beneficiaries are under the age of eighteen. Otherwise, the bank or institution will hold that account until they reach this age, or you will have to get a conservatorship over the minor to gain access to those funds before they reach 18.

Another thing you can do is to make sure nothing is payable to your “Estate,” as referenced above. Many families have to go through probate because the nursing home refused to write a refund check (after death of a resident) to anyone other than the “Estate of Resident.” Like said above, this would require this refund check get probated through the courts to get received by the heirs. To avoid probate, make sure the nursing or assisted living facility will make any refund check payable to a surviving heir or your trust account, if you have one.

One really important step that clients often forget is that they need to put the later acquired property into their trust. If you purchase a home or other asset later in life, you have to put it in the name of your trust. Or if you open a new bank account, open the account in the name of your trust . It’s steps like these that will make your estate get probated, even if you have a trust.

Some of these steps above can be done if you have a trust or not. For example, putting beneficiaries on accounts can be done by someone who does not have a trust, and can make their probate process move much quicker. Getting a will is also a good idea if you cannot afford a trust, since it will also speed up the probate process. Contact the offices of Skillern Law Firm to discuss your estate planning needs today.

When would I need a conservatorship?

Skillern Law Firm, PLLC  offers legal services for conservatorship proceedings. Conservatorship proceedings are similar to Guardianship proceedings, in that it gives one person or people the rights over another people’s dealings. A conservatorship is a legal proceeding where a judge appoints a person or organization (the “conservator”) to care for another adult/child’s (the “conservatee”) finances if they become incapacitated or are a minor.

For example, if your grandmother did not get a Durable Power of Attorney drafted, and then she gets Alzheimer where she is completely disabled in her mental and physical capabilities, then whoever needs to take over her finances to pay her bills, organize her portfolio, and pay the assisted living center would need to get a conservatorship via a court proceeding to be able to do so. Another example is where an elderly grandmother put her grandchildren as beneficiaries on life insurance, and when she passes away they are all minors. A bank or institution usually requires a court proceeding of conservatorship for the parent or person who could use the money to take care of the children before they will release the money to the person. Otherwise, the institution would hold onto the money until the child/children turns eighteen (18), which could be a long time for some situations. (This is another reason why you should not designate minor beneficiaries on any of your accounts!)

The best way to avoid this problem is to get a Durable Power of Attorney. It’s a simple, and relatively cheap document that prevents the need of conservatorship proceeding (which is A LOT more expensive). Please read an earlier post by Skillern Law Firm that deals with Power of Attorneys here. I reiterate – a Power of Attorney is a very important document to have in your estate planning portfolio. If you or a friend did not get one, however, and you become incapacitated to deal with you health or financial needs, the courts have guardianship and conservatorship proceedings that your family and friends can go through. Please contact Skillern Law Firm, PLLC today to discuss your estate planning needs!

%d bloggers like this: