HIPAA Authorizations – Why They Are Important

HIPAA Authorizations – Why They Are Important

blank prescription pad

In 2003, the United States Department of Health and Human Services enacted regulations under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, or as it is more commonly known, “HIPAA”. Under this new law, medical providers can face serious sanctions and monetary fines for releasing unauthorized  “Protected Health Information,” usually meaning medical records. As a result, medical providers are very reluctant to release records to anyone other than the patient.

What does HIPAA protect?

Under HIPAA, protected health information includes everything and anything created or received by a “covered entity” relating to an individual’s mental or physical health condition, and that could be used to identify the individual. Health care providers, pharmacies, nursing homes, and insurance companies are all included in the definition of “covered entities.”

However, since the definitions under HIPAA are so broad, medical providers will not release information to anyone other than a patient without a HIPAA release form, a complete estate plan should always include a HIPAA authorization.

How to Authorize Release of Protected Information

A a stand-alone HIPAA authorization is now viewed as the preferred methods to use, and the attorney at the Skillern Law Firm prefers this document in estate plans.Without a signed HIPPA authorization, even a spouse or adult child of an incapacitated patient will not be able to receive information on the patient’s condition, since the HIPAA law is so strict and the sanctions are severe.

HIPAA authorizations allow individuals to name specific people to whom medical providers may release records. An authorization should allow medical providers to release records to an individual’s agent under a Health Care Power of Attorney. An authorization may also include an agent under a Durable Power of Attorney, a trustee of a trust or an individual’s attorney for the purpose of determining incapacity. The HIPAA authorization should be a document that is always included in your estate plan, because the people that you have nominated in many of your estate documents may need to get a hold of medical records to satisfy their fiduciary duties under the other documents.

Conclusion

If you would like to make sure that your family members or appointed trustee, power of attorney or guardian will be able to access your medical records so that they make informed decisions on your behalf in the event of your incapacity, it is imperative to have both a valid Health Care Power of Attorney and HIPAA authorization. Have an estate planning attorney prepare the documents for you ensure that they are properly drafted and signed. The Skillern Law Firm specializes in estate planning documents and would love to help you organize and create a well-drafted and complete estate plan.

 

The Problems of Successor Co-Trustees in a Trust

trusteesA creator or grantor of a normal revocable living trust usually serves as the trustee of a trust until their incapacity or death. After one of those events, a successor trustee takes over the trust to manage and administer the trust assets. Some trust creators have two children or have two people they trust enough to make them successor co-trustees of their trust, which puts two people in charge of the trust simultaneously. This can create problems if the co-trustee duties are not clearly spelled out.

One common problem associated with co-trustees is if the two trustees have to act jointly with each other, meaning they need to sign deeds, checks, and other financial documents together. This can slow down the process, especially if one or both trustees do not live near one another or are not communicating with each other. This can also slow down or cause problems when one trustee goes out of town for vacation, is incapacitated, etc.  A well written trust agreement should provide for replacement of a co-trustee who cannot serve for some reason, or state that the remaining co-trustee can act alone in this scenario.

Another common problem with co-trustees is what happens if there is a disagreement between them about the administration of the trust.  It is amazing how many problems and family strife can occur when the matriarch or patriarch of the family passes away. If co-trustees do not trust one anther, do not get along, or just do not agree with the decision of the other co-trustee, it may require court intervention to break the disagreement. For example, if one trustee wants to sell some property and distribute cash and a co-trustee wants to retain the property, there is a stalemate. If there are three co-trustees, the majority prevails, so an odd number of co-trustees are not such an issue in regards to disagreement.  However, if co-trustees are assigned equal authority and responsibility in the trust agreement, some third-party intervention will be needed, and that can get costly.

A common way to avoid common co-trustee problems is to name a trust administrating institution, like a bank or trust company, as the principal trustee, with children or other beneficiaries as co-trustees. That essentially places control of trust with an independent third party, who can be an mediator if the co-trustees cannot agree. Another way is to just name one sole trustee, like your oldest or most responsible child or friend.

One of the best ways to avoid this problem is to talk to a qualified estate planning attorney who can help solve problems like this. Consider getting your estate planning done by the attorney at the Skillern Law Firm. She can help make sure your estate plan is well written and will not problems in the future that can be easily avoided.

Holiday Open House Cancelled

Our Holiday Open House – which was scheduled for this Thursday, December 5th, is now cancelled. The local news is expecting low temperatures and winter weather. 

We will reschedule our Open House for some time early next year, so please be watching and reading for rescheduling news!

Thank you and be safe.

2013 Holiday Open House

Plan on attending the Skillern Law Firm’s 2013 Holiday Open House at or South Tulsa office. NO RSVP required. Food and refreshments provided. It is happening from 4:00-7:00 PM on December 5th, 2013.

If you would like to discuss your estate planning needs, or just come for some good conversation, feel free to attend!

2013 Holiday Open House Invite

(Minor) Children in Your Estate Planning

Travelers with Baby in StrollerWhen handling people’s estate plans, I am often asked how life insurance, retirement accounts, and other “beneficiary” property should be handled with regards to the young children. More often than not,  people with children want some or all of the proceeds of these accounts to go to their minor children.

For example, if a client has a $100,000 life insurance policy and has a minor child of 5 years old, she would most likely tell me or the insurance agent that she wants her child to be the beneficiary of the life insurance. The questions presented in this situation are:

  1. What happens to the money and any other property when her minor child inherits or receives it?
  2. Is there a better way to handle life insurance proceeds or other property that you want to leave to a child?

To answer the first question presented, let’s look at Oklahoma’s law on minors. Children or minors are legally incapable of holding and managing that property until the reach the age of majority, which, in Oklahoma, is the age 18. While they are still considered minors in Oklahoma, any property or money a minor owns must be managed by another person, such as a guardian or custodian. IMPORTANTLY, for the most part, the financial institutions will require the guardian to go to court and receive Letters of Guardianship  before the institution will release the funds into the guardian’s control. This applies to parents. Therefore, if a grandparent left a minor as a beneficiary of an account, the minor’s parent would have to go through the court process of Guardianship (which can be expensive), before the parent will gain control of the minor’s assets. This is an expensive complication to leaving an asset to a minor child, because court processes comes with attorney fees, accounting fees, filing fees, just to name a few.

In the above scenario, when the child turns 18, he or she can take over the management and control of the property or money. Oklahoma law generally does not require a specific level of financial literacy, planning, or common sense to manage or control your own property. Thus, the young teenager may squander the monies that was given to them very quickly, since they have full control of it once they turn 18. And how many 18 year old teenagers do you know that would know how to handle a lump sum of $100,000 responsibly?

THE GOOD NEWS is that there are other, more responsible approaches to leaving minors an inheritance. Rather than naming your child directly to receive the proceeds of a life insurance policy, or any other beneficiary account, you can set up a revocable or irrevocable trust that has your minor child as a beneficiary. This allows you to provide for appropriate use and management of the property with certain guidelines and control that will not let the minor child to squander their inheritance, and it won’t include any court process or fees. Unlike custodial arrangements discussed above, a trust does not necessarily terminate at age 18 and can continue to provide supervised management of the property into adulthood, including planning for education and other life-events. To read more about trusts, read a previous article by our attorney here.

The Trustee, or the person who manages the trust’s money and property, can also be empowered to use the Trust’s money for the benefit of the child, without the need and cost of court supervision. This can be helpful because it allows you to have more control over the types of expenses you want to provide for your child, including health, education, and general expenses one might occur as a young adult.

Remember, selecting a beneficiary for any type of monetary account is an important decision with potentially far-reaching consequences. There are important legal implications depending on your choice. Selecting a beneficiary is part of your overall estate plan, and the attorney at the Skillern Law Firm, PLLC can help plan for your minor children or grandchildren. Call our office at to speak to our attorney today!

Call for a Free Consultation!

 

Penni Skillern, Esq.

Penni Skillern, Esq.

Know you need an estate plan, but don’t know what you need or where to start? Call our offices today for a FREE CONSULTATION with our Attorney, Penni Skillern, Esq.

Our attorney takes a comprehensive and integrated approach to estate planning. Your estate plan should complete your vision, goals, values, and needs for the future. To learn more about how estate planning can assist you in furthering your goals, contact our office in Tulsa, Oklahoma today at (918) 805-2511.

 

Funding A Revocable Trust

funding trustWhenever an attorney creates a Revocable Living Trust for a client, the trust needs to be funded.  “What does it mean to fund a trust?” is a common question that our attorney at the Skillern Law Firm  gets from clients.  It is a very important step in the estate planning process. To see what a Revocable Living Trust can do for you, read our previous blog post about the types of trusts and their advantages. A trust, if funded correctly, will allow its creator(s) to avoid the probate process. An unfunded or partially funded trust does not allow your assets to avoid probate, because only the assets owned by the trust at your death or payable to the trust at your death avoid the probate process.

There are a few common misconceptions about the trust funding process.

Myth #1 – Since you formed a trust and have a Trust Agreement, the trust is complete and there is nothing else that needs to be done. 

When you sign or form a trust with an estate planning attorney, signing to document is only the first step in the trust-creating process.  The attorney, or the client, needs to make sure ALL of the assets held by the trust-creators (or “trustors”) are put in the trust’ss name, or has the trust as the listed beneficiary of the account. Otherwise, the Trust Agreement is an expensive pile of paper that will not help the creator’s avoid probate. The attorney at the Skillern Law Firm funds all of the trusts she helps create, taking this important step out of the client’s hands.

Myth # 2 – When the trust was created, there was a list of all the property on an Exhibit or Schedule that’s attached to my trust, so that transferred my assets to the trust… right?

Many trusts have an exhibit or schedule of property. This is a helpful document that helps a successor trustee in ascertaining what property they should be managing and accounting for. Updating this exhibit or schedule as the “big-ticket” items change is important so that the information on the exhibit is generally up to date. However, merely putting a description of the property on a schedule or property addendum does not legally transfer the ownership of the property into the trust. That needs to be done outside of these exhibits/schedules, most likely by property deeds and beneficiary designations.

How do you fund a trust?

To fund a trust, the attorney or client needs to file the property deeds with the county its located in, and put the trust as the beneficiary on all accounts.  To fund business interest, you will need to assign closely held business interests to your trust. Like all things in life, there can be tax consequences and benefits to each course of action. You should always seek tax advice prior to making a transfer of property, because once transfers are completed, there is often no undo button for tax purposes.  Whenever our attorney create a trust for a client, she makes sure she funds the trust at creation, but it is up to the client to keep the trust correctly funded after signing.

What are the benefits of a fully funded trust?

The biggest benefit of a correctly and fully funded trust is that it allows your beneficiaries to avoid probate. One more important benefit of a fully funded trust is that it allows for easier management of your property in the event of your incapacity. A truse can also can save on administration costs upon your death or incapacity, since your successor trustee and beneficiaries will not have to spend as much time and money locating your property.

Having a revocable trust in your estate planning portfolio is important for those who want to avoid probate and keep their estate administration as easy as possible. Funding your revocable trust is an absolute necessity if you want the benefits of avoiding probate and having management of your property in the event of your incapacity. Funding your revocable trust is a necessity that should be completed and worked on along with the creation of your trust. Call the Skillern Law Firm today to get your estate planning done today!

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